4 Fertility Myths: What’s True and What’s Not?

Any couple who have difficulty having a baby have experienced at some point being overwhelmed with information, opinions, and tips they get from the internet, relatives, and friends about getting pregnant. If you face the same situation, how will you distinguish the truth from misconceptions?

Here are some of the common myths about fertility that you should be aware of.

1. More frequent sex means a better chance of pregnancy.

Getting pregnant has to do more with a female’s ovulation rather than the frequency (or even the quality) of sex. Even if you do it more than 10 times daily, you’re not guaranteed of conceiving a baby. Let’s set your expectations right—there’s no difference in pregnancy rates between couples who had sex every day and those who do so less frequently. This fact is backed up by a major study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

2. Taking guaifenesin before ovulation will improve fertility.

Guaifenesin, better known by the brand Robitussin, is an expectorant that theoretically thins out the cervical mucus, much in the same way as it does to the mucus in the lungs. Some people believe that the thinner the cervical mucus is, the easier for the sperm to swim through the cervix and reach the egg. Although guaifenesin can really help in thinning the mucus, it’s not yet proven if thin mucus is enough to get you pregnant.

3. Cycling lowers sperm count.

Not necessarily. While in theory, the force on the testicular area caused by biking can affect fertility, there’s no clinical study yet that proves the correlation between cycling and decreased sperm count.

4. Having sex with the lights on or during the day can help you conceive faster.

Again, no clinical study has been done yet to prove this claim, though some studies found that sperm count is quite higher in the morning.

Have you heard one or two of these myths before? Do your research and help dispel the misconceptions by telling off people who love sharing those absurd “facts.”